Jiri Mountain Tea

"Sourcing Artisan Nokcha From Jirisan"

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~Jirisan Gabriel~

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1 Comment

Reply Vibrators
10:27 AM on May 23, 2019 
During the three days I was in Hadong in July I was given a tour of the area and taken to the valley where there are famous tea plantations along the river and on the sides of the mountains. We were served the beautiful and sweet tasting tea at an organic plantation. It was this experience, along with seeing the low rows of tea bushes that gave me the idea of planting a snaking line of tea bushes to animate the line of proposed stones. This would then make a growing piece which would have to be cared for by the college into the future and would further link water from the mountains, and soil from the earth, so that these elements could be imbibed through the drinking of tea by students, as a way of embodying the landscape. Further, the line of stones pointing at the mountain peak resembles an acupuncture meridian line in the body and is another way of connection from people to landscape, much as the ancient Ley lines and stone rows of Britain act in our own landscapes. This in essence links to similar confusion ideas in the Korean landscape. The first tea seeds were brought here to Jiri Mountain from China in the year 828 and planted under the kings orders. The Zen master Jingam bred the tea in 830 and spread the growing of tea throughout Korea. My own family s connection on both my mother s and may father s side is rather more modest and goes back a mere four generations of tea planters and brokers in Ceylon. All this makes me very happy to incorporate tea into a sculpture here in Korea.